Renewable Energy

Renewable energy is energy which comes from natural resources such as sunlight, wind, rain, tides, and geothermal heat, which are renewable (naturally replenished). About 16% of global final energy consumption comes from renewables, with 10% coming from traditional biomass, which is mainly used for heating, and 3.4% from hydroelectricity. New renewables (small hydro, modern biomass, wind, solar, geothermal, and biofuels) accounted for another 2.8% and are growing very rapidly.

The share of renewables in electricity generation is around 19%, with 16% of global electricity coming from hydroelectricity and 3% from new renewables. All tough many renewable energy projects are large-scale, renewable technologies are also suited to rural and remote areas, where energy is often crucial in human development.

Energy forms a key part of our everyday lives. We need it to switch on our lights, drive our cars, make the products we use and keep warm in winter in our homes and workplaces. As the global economy grows, demand for energy increases as the number of appliances we own increases and we demand more functionality from new products.

Energy is used to support human life all over the world. It is the stuff that runs our computers, charges our mp3 players and cell phones, runs our TV's, and drives our cars. In some way every thing we use uses energy so we can not live without energy.

Renewable Energy is the wave of the future. There is nothing more pressing today than finding renewable, clean energy sources. Renewable Energy is abundant and we need to find a solution in harnessing that energy.

Airflow can be used to run wind turbines. Modern wind turbines range from around 600 kW to 5 MW of rated power, although turbines with rated output of 1.5-3 MW have become the most common for commercial use.

 

The power output of a turbine is a function of the cube of the wind speed, so as wind speed increases, power output increases dramatically. Areas where winds are stronger and more constant, such as offshore and high altitude sites, are preferred locations for wind farms. Typical capacity factors are 20-40%, with values at the upper end of the range in particularly favorable sites.

 

Wind power is renewable and produces no greenhouse gases during operation, such as carbon dioxide and methane.